Wednesday
Sep152010

Videos in PubMed

The Krafty Librarian pointed out today that PubMed indexes a few (750+) videos under the publication type 'interactive tutorial'.  I know a bit about PubMed, but this is a [pt] I haven't come across.  Interestingly, the oldest indexed 'interactive tutorial' is from '91.  I can't proxy into it, so I'm not sure what the deal is.  The NEJM videos, including its Videos in Clinical Medicine series (which Krafty mentions), are worth a look.   

 

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Update: Eagle Dawg found mention of 'interactive tutorial' in the NLM Bulletin:

 

Interactive Tutorial describes items published online and consisting primarily of non-narrative text, such as a video recording or other interactive content in which the sequence of content presented depends upon interaction from the user. The only narrative text may be the abstract; otherwise there is little or no "traditional" narrative text.

 

And the MESH Scope Note:

 

Consisting of video recordings or other files that reveal material selectively according to user guidance.

 

With these in mind, the '91 article is certainly a curiosity.

Wednesday
Sep152010

Video Games Lead to Faster Decisions

I like the idea of adding video games - and even video game rooms - to libraries.  It's also good to know I didn't waste my youth on the NES:

 

Cognitive scientists from the University of Rochester have discovered that playing action video games trains people to make the right decisions faster. The researchers found that video game players develop a heightened sensitivity to what is going on around them, and this benefit doesn't just make them better at playing video games, but improves a wide variety of general skills that can help with everyday activities like multitasking, driving, reading small print, keeping track of friends in a crowd, and navigating around town.

 

From ScienceDaily

Tuesday
Aug312010

JMLA 07/10

The July issue of JMLA has a number of interesting articles on successful librarian integrations in EHRs:

1. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, w/ the help of its librarians, is integrating EHRs into the curriculum to prepare graduates for the current & future EHR environment.  Even if EHRs undergo significant changes over the next few years (which they certainly will), it makes sense.  Integrate. 

In somewhat of an aside, the authors make an important observation:

Questions remain about what is technically feasible and what is appropriate when integrating specific medical decision support tools into the EHR.  

What became perfectly clear to me at Woods Hole this year is that everything abt the EHR is TBD.  So how to best connect the clinical resources (Dynamed, UpToDate, NGC, PubMed, Cochrane, etc., etc.) with the EHR is a great question and one that should be now on the collective mind of every library that supports an EHR-using hospital. 

2. Clinical librarians at The University of Washington have been able to obtain access to the EMR.  This struck me as an incredible achievement, and one that makes complete sense given that the EHR is a frontline information resource for docs.  

3. The Eskind Biomedical Library at Vanderbilt University Medical Center has integrated evidence into the EMR and order sets.

All are definitely worth a look. Especially since such integration is - I'd say - essential for us (librarians) moving forward.

Sunday
Aug222010

Slide Design Star Wars-Style

Clearly, the General could've used PPT.

Then:

Now:

via Presentation Zen.

Wednesday
Jun162010

On... Communication

...from the introduction to my copy of Gombrowicz's Ferdydurke:

...at worst the book will pass unnoticed, but friends and acquaintances when they meet me will certainly feel under an obligation to say to me the sort of thing that is always said when an author publishes a book.  I should like to ask them to do nothing of the sort.  No, let them say nothing, because, as a result of all sorts of falsifications, the social situation of the so-called 'artist' in our times has become so pretentious that whatever can be said in such circumstances sounds false, and the more sincerity and simplicity you put into your 'I enjoyed it enormously' or 'I like it very much indeed', the more shameful it is for him and for you.  I therefore beg you to keep silent.  Keep silent in hope of a better future.  For the time being - if you wish to let me know that the book pleased you - when you see me simply touch your right ear.  If you touch your left ear, I shall know that you didn't like it, and if you touch your nose it will mean that you are not sure... thus we shall avoid uncomfortable and even ridiculous situations and understand each other in silence.  My greetings to all.